Mars Photo Gallery
Mars Watch 2003 Facts - Link to facts about Mars and the 2003 closest approach.

Images of Mars from some club members.

November 21, 2003
By Phil Hoyle. Location: Malabar Farm State Park, Scope: 10" LX200,
Video composite using Registax, Camera: Sony TRV33

October 6, 2003.
By Phil Hoyle. My first attempt at Mars with my new video camera.
The seeing conditions were only slightly better than average.  First I
made 13 separate images from 445 frames of video each. After I got
the 13 separate images, I stacked them.

Scope: 10" LX200
Camera: Sony TRV33
Afocal projection using 30 mm plossl eyepiece.

Mars, September 6, 2003
By Dave Ross
This is with my 6" reflector at about f/70 using eyepiece
projection with an OM-1 camera, 1/15th sec. on Kodak iso 400 High
Definition (so called) film, scanned from a print and enhanced using the
little sliders in my printer software.

Mars, September 6, 2003.
Time: Approx 1:17 am
By Bill Castro and Fred Grosse
Location: Public Viewing Night at The Wilderness Center, Wilmot, OH
Scope: Meade 10 in. F10  LX200 SCT
with 2X barlow and IR blocking filter.
Camera: Taken with an Astrovid Stellacam at 1.5x digital zoom
Recorded onto a Sony Hi-8 camcorder used as a video tape recorder.
Single frame digitized with Dazzle Digital photo maker.
Image is slightly enhanced. Central meridial is approx 327 degrees.
Syrtis Major is on the right side pointing down.


Mars August 31, 2003, 0630 UT
By Jim Rudick.
This was taken with a Sony DSC F-707 digital camera.
Took this just holding the Sony digicam over the eyepiece of my 10 inch  dob.
 


.
Left August 28th 1:00 am ET | Right July 20th 2:30 am ET


 


Left - Mars, August 28th 1:00 am ET
By Bill Castro.
Location: Louisville, OH
Scope: Meade 8 in. F10  LX200 SCT
with 2X barlow at 2.5X and IR blocking filter.
Camera: Taken with an Astrovid Stellacam
Recorded onto a Sony Hi-8 camcorder used as a video tape recorder.
Single frame digitized with Dazzle Digital photo maker.
Central meridian is approx. 42 degrees.
diameter 25.11", mag -2.9
Right - July 20th 2:30 am ET. Compare the 8/28 image (left) with the
image on right taken on July 20th, diameter 20.34" mag -2.0.
Note that in the August image the disk is larger, the phase is full
and the polar ice cap is smaller than in the July  image.

A John Waechter image of Mars.
Date: August 22, 2003 at 11:46 pm ET.
Location: The Wilderness Center
Scope: 7 inch f/15 Meade LX200 Maksutov Cassegrain
Camera: SBIG STV
60ms exposure, yellow filter, at prime focus with a 2X barlow.

Mars July 26, 2003, 0530 UT
By Jim Rudick.
This was taken with a Sony DSC F-707 digital camera.
Took this just holding the Sony digicam over the eyepiece of my 10 inch  dob.

Mars, July 26, 2003, 2:00am ET.
By Bill Castro
Location: The Wilderness Center, Wilmot, OH
Scope:: Resetar Telescope Meade 10 in. F10  LX200 SCT
with 2X barlow and IR blocking filter.
Camera: Taken with an Astrovid Stellacam
Recorded onto a Sony Hi-8 camcorder used as a video tape recorder.
Single frame digitized with Dazzle Digital photo maker.
Image is slightly enhanced. Central meridial is approx 350 degrees.

.

Mars, July 20, 2003, 2:30am ET
By Bill Castro.
Location: Louisville, OH
Scope: Meade 8 in. F10  LX200 SCT
with 2X barlow at 2.5X and IR blocking filter.
Camera: Taken with an Astrovid Stellacam
Recorded onto a Sony Hi-8 camcorder used as a video tape recorder.
Single frame digitized with Dazzle Digital photo maker.
Image on right is slightly enhanced and shaded red.
Central meridian is approx. 40 degrees
diameter 20.34" mag -2.0.

Mars June 29, 2003, 0800 UDT
By Jim Rudick.
This was taken with a Sony DSC F-707 digital camera.
Took this just holding the Sony digicam over the eyepiece of my 10 inch  dob.
I checked the chart and at the time this was taken, the dark spot corresponds to Syrtis M
 


Return to Astro Events

Last updated March 12, 2005 by Bill Castro