Bill Castro
 
  • Years lived in Ohio: I’ve lived here in Northeast Ohio since 1991. I was born and raised in Arizona where I was spoiled with clear skies and warm weather. Although it is cloudy here I’m lucky to set up once a week in my back yard. With my busy work and home schedule I can’t get out as often as there are clear nights.

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  • Profession (day job): By day I’m an electrical engineer.

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  • Years with the club: Since 1997.

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  • Club positions held: I have been web master the longest, I have been been past President, Secretary and the Observatory Coordinator.

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  • Years observing: I’ve been seriously observing since 1996. I remember observing with my unaided eye all the time growing up in Arizona. I guess I took the night sky for granted. I told myself then that someday, when I had the time, I would get a telescope and better understand what was up there. After living in large light polluted cities of San Jose, Chicago and Boston it was nice to see the stars again in my new Louisville, OH location (NLM of 5.3). I’m not getting any younger so I made the time. For Fathers Day in 1996 I received  a 4.5 inch Newtonian telescope to better understand what was up there and I am still trying to figure it out.

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  • Formal astronomy training: None.

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  • Special projects: Maintaining the WCAC web page, Astronomy merit badge councilor, point of contact for the Deep Sky Observing, Variable Star and Meteor Watches special interest groups.

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  • Scopes presently owned: I presently use a Celestron 11 inch Nexstar F10 SCT as my main scope with an Orion 100mm ED  f/9 refractor as a quick setup scope for casual observing, a 16 inch Meade Lightbridge (affectionately known as the "Water Tower" ( named after its predecesor, a 13.1 inch Coulter dob A.K.A. the "Water Heater" that is now a club scope) for deep space and public viewing and a Celestron 80 mm F5 refractor for viewing sunspots with a video camera attached. When asked 'how many scopes do you need' I refer them to Ed Ting's article and review of the Coulter in scopereviews.com page 3.

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  • Type of observing most interested in; Variable star observing is first as an observer (CWO) with the AAVSO. This is followed by deep space objects with an occasional planet thrown in. Meteor showers are always interesting as well. The public star watch programs are always fun to participate in.

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  • Visions for the club: I see the new Astronomy Education Building and The Wilderness Center as a great asset to the clubs charter of promoting the knowledge and enjoyment of astronomy among our club members, our parent organization - The Wilderness Center and the Northeast Ohio Community at large.  I would like to see the club continue to help individuals new to the hobby gain experience as well as helping experienced amateurs continue their interests and explore new areas of the hobby.

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